Dividend Income – October 2020

Auto-pilot is the mode I am in right now. The portfolio DRIPs everywhere except in my non-registered account. I try to add $1,000 per month if I can and use the dividends paid and to put it to work along with my contribution. The holdings in my non-registered account are very intentional. They are the boring retirement income stocks and I pick the one that scores well in my Dividend Snapshot screener to add to.

As you read through, you will noticed detailed graphs built from all the data I track to monitor and manage my portfolio. Just like an airplane pilot needs its instruments to navigate in the air, I need my investment data to manage my portfolio. Don't manage your portfolio blindly hoping for results, you'll be sorry later.

Stock Trades

I had a handfull of BIPC shares I decided to unload. Between BIP.UN and BIPC, I decided to keep BIP.UN for now in one account and sold the BIPC shares. With the proceeds, I added to Intact Financial. I still have BIPC shares in another account. The shares have certainly performed well since the creation of the corporation.

Portfolio Management

As I work towards setting up an income portfolio, as opposed to a growth portfolio, I strive to organize my holdings by accounts for tax efficiency. Since there are no taxes in a TFSA, it’s important that it holds my dividend growth stocks as the growth will alway outpace the income. As the amount of money I can put in a TFSA is limited, it will not be the primary source of income.

My RRSP is always maxed out and primarily through my employer’s account which leaves my non-registered account. Nevertheless, I have a large RRSP dividend portfolio primarily invested in US stocks. As I have to declare all withdrawals as income, dividend income or dividend growth needs to be balanced against the withdrawals if I want to maintain the same withdrawal rate without any impact to the capital.

That leads me to my non-registered account strategy. If you pay attention to my portfolio holdings, you will noticed they are banks, utilities and a couple of millionaire makers. The yield is definitely up there in the 4%-5% based on today’s valuation and the businesses are generally safe.

My holdings between income and growth looks as follow now. I need to start breaking it down my account types to see the patterns towards tax optimization.

wdt_IDDividendLow GrowthMedium GrowthHigh GrowthTotal

Dividend Income

My October dividend income is weird as I have updated all my transactions in my dividend tracker to be based on the deposit date and some holdings that would normally pay on the last day of October are now paying early in November as the month end is on a weekend. Our digital economy on the banking side is still restricted to M-F 9-5 banking hours it seems …

The tally for October is at $1,475 which is pushing close to $1,000 in dividend income to November. It is what it is and it’s a reminder to all retirees that you should not be relying on this month dividend to pay the bills … This month’s dividend should be for year 2 or 3 of your cash strategy.

Here is the overall portfolio dividend income contribution by accounts:

Accounts Income % Value %
TFSA 19.31% 20.17%
RRSP 38.13% 51.52%
Taxable 32.59% 23.12%

I can only do the analysis and planning I do with my portfolio because I have all the data in place in my tracker. There is no way I can do this with Questrade, RBC Direct Investing or any other discount broker. Being in control is not just about making decisions but it’s about having all the data and graphs that you need to answer your own questions. Don’t wait to start tracking your portfolio details.

As I plan for financial independence, I like to ignore the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) as it can provide a buffer for any errors in calculation or unexpected challenges. While I know I will receive some CPP, I plan on not receiving any OAS (or more specifically have the OAS Clawback taking it all back).

DISCLOSURE: Please note that I may have a position in one or many of the holdings listed. For a complete list of my holdings, please see my Dividend Portfolio.

DISCLAIMER: Please note that this blog post represents my opinion and not an advice/recommendation. I am not a financial adviser, I am not qualified to give financial advice. Before you buy any stocks/funds consult with a qualified financial planner. Make your investment decisions at your own risk – see my full disclaimer for more details.
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